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New Study Reveals Sugar in Some Chocolate Confectionery Products have Increased since 1992

18 August 2019

  • New study published in the journal Nutrients aimed to compare the sugar (1992, 2017) and energy (2017) content of chocolate confectionery available in the UK between 1992 and 2017.
  • There were 23 products found in both 1992 and 2017. The average sugar content per 100 g for these products increased by 23%.
  • The study suggests sugar levels can be reduced because (a) lower sugar versions of the same products existed in 1992 and (b) there is a large variation in sugar and energy content between different categories of chocolate and within the same category in 2017.

Media Coverage

Table: Sugar content in popular chocolate confectionery in 1992 and 2017 per 100g

Product Name

1992 Sugars (g) per 100g*

2017 Sugars (g) per 100g

Cadbury Bournville Classic Dark Chocolate

55

57.5

Nestle Milkybar

55.7

57.3

Cadbury Dairy Milk Fruit & Nut

32

54.5

Sainsbury's Milk Chocolate 100g (Milk Chocolate per 50g bar in 1992)

22.9

53.6

Nestle Crunch

50

51.5

Sainsbury's Taste the Difference Swiss Milk Chocolate

43

49.5

Cadbury Dairy Milk Whole Nut

47

48

Sainsbury's Milk Chocolate Brazil Nuts

32.7

41

Cadbury Dairy Milk Buttons

47

56

Cadbury Fudge

50

65

Cadbury Flake Chocolate Bar

47

55.5

Cadbury Wispa

42

52

Cadbury Dairy Milk

47

56

Cadbury Dairy Milk Caramel

42

53.5

Marks & Spencer Swiss Milk Chocolate

43

50.2

Nestle Milkybar Buttons

59

57.3

Fry's Chocolate Cream

60

65.5

Cadbury Crunchie

50

65

Fry's Turkish Delight

38

64

Nestle Yorkie Raisin & Biscuit

53

58

Cadbury Double Decker

40

54

Cadbury Curly Wurly

40

49

Cadbury Picnic

30

45

* Octavo: A–Z of Shopping; Guide to Good Health. What’s in your shopping basket? (Unavailable online)

Registered Nutritionist Dr Kawther Hashem, Campaign Lead at Action on Sugar based at Queen Mary University of London says: “Excess sugar intake contributes to the high rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes and tooth decay in the UK. It is alarming that sugar levels have risen over time in some well-known chocolate confectionery products. Despite what companies say, clearly reformulation is possible because products were lower in sugar over two decades ago.”

 

 

 

 

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